Barking Decoded – The Meaning Behind the Bark

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There are many different types of dog barks. Can you decode them? Getting to know your dog’s barks is a great way to gain a better mutual understanding.
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Dogs have a distinct bark for certain things. There are many different types of dog barks. Getting to know your dog’s various barks is a great way to gain a better understanding of their needs. Each bark conveys a different feeling. Much like a mother knowing her baby is hungry from the tone of her baby’s cry barks are the same. Listen carefully and read your pup’s body language to learn more about what she is trying to tell you.  

Decoding the Different Types of Dog Barks

I can’t count the number of times I wished my dog could text me. He can’t text. And he can’t talk to tell me what he needs or what is wrong. But he can bark. It’s the best way Pups can get your attention. I have a list to help you decode what dog’s bark means. Next time you hear your four-legged friend barking away, you’ll know what’s up.

I have a list to help you decode what your dog's bark means. Next time you hear your four-legged friend barking away, you’ll know what’s up. Click To Tweet

Non-Stop Barking

Non-stop barking is more than just annoying. This type of bark means Pup thinks he’s in danger. He is trying to alert you to a problem. Guard dogs will use non-stop bark while on alert. She could be looking out a window or doorway. She sees what she perceives as a threat and is trying to clue you in. This bark is also means of trying to ward off the “intruder.” Many small dogs use the non-stop bark when they feel threatened due to their size. There are many different types of dog barks. Can you decode them? Getting to know your dog’s barks is a great way to gain a better mutual understanding.

Quick and Low Tone Bark

Pup wants you to stop what you are doing. A lot of times this is used from one dog to another dog or pet. Often when one dog wants to play and the other doesn’t. It is mostly an “I’m not in the mood right now” type of bark.

High Pitched Yelp

One high pitch yap means your dog is hurting. Maybe you stepped on their paw or hit them on accident with the door. This bark means that Pup got hurt in some way. In some cases, a dog can also use the high-pitched yelp in anticipation of pain. I have seen this in a lot of dogs that have abusive pasts. They use it as a warning that they think something is going to hurt them.

There are many different types of dog barks. Can you decode them? Getting to know your dog’s barks is a great way to gain a better mutual understanding.

Prolonged Bark in Intervals

Generally, this means they want attention from you. Have you been gone all day and then not showed enough attention to him? Maybe you came in and started cooking dinner right away. With this bark, Fido is asking for a little play time. And there are pets in order!

Low Bark That Moves to Medium Pitch

This is a very playful bark. Pup is having fun and wants to keep playing. Maybe you are being silly. Pup is letting you know she digs it! This is a good bark to hear, it means your dog is really happy.

Sharp Barks

Your dog wants to greet you. He wants your attention right away. With a very sharp bark, they are saying “hey!”

Series of Yelps

Your dog is hurting very bad. This type of bark is more like a cry. A series of yelps means that he is in continued pain. You need to stop what you are doing and examine your pup. Look and feel them all over. Try to notice if they are favoring a certain body part. A lot of little injuries can be cured with an at-home doggie first aid kit. If you cannot address the pain and the yelps do not stop. It is very severe. You will need to take them to the vet.

There are many different types of dog barks. Can you decode them? Getting to know your dog’s barks is a great way to gain a better mutual understanding.

 

I am a big advocate for learning about how to communicate better with your pup. This does not only include how to get them to understand you. Communication is a two-way street. Learning to listen to your buddy’s needs will strengthen your bond and grow the trust between you two.

If you enjoyed this post and want to learn a little more about the different types of dog barks. This article on petsafe.net has some great information about what the various pitches and frequencies of barks mean. Check it out!

Are you into barks? Start a howl in the comments below. Let me know what you think about the different types of dog barks. How easily are you able to understand what your pup is telling you??

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There are many different types of dog barks. Can you decode them? Getting to know your dog’s barks is a great way to gain a better mutual understanding.

15 Responses

  1. I'm Busy Being Awesome
    | Reply

    This is so interesting! I’ve always wondered what my dog’s barks meant. His sharp bark is definitely an attention getter. Usually to tell me, “Hey! I want to go outside!” 🙂 Great post!

    • Front Seat Ryder
      | Reply

      😁 Yep. I’m glad you enjoyed my post.

  2. Celeste Godoy
    | Reply

    Such an interesting post, thank you! We just got an aussie sister for our male schnauzer and it’s really fun to see (and hear) the different kind of barks and sounds they use to communicate with each other.

    • Front Seat Ryder
      | Reply

      I’m so glad you enjoyed my post. Aww, Aussies and Schnauzers are both such awesome breeds!! 😍😍

  3. Kirsten @ObtainingBliss.com
    | Reply

    I love how you break down each type of bark, so awesome!! I’m sending this to my hubby, since he likes to just ask our dog repeatedly, “What do you want?” LOL

    • Front Seat Ryder
      | Reply

      Hahaha!! Not going to lie, I do that to all the time just to tease him. I’m a mean dog mom. 😂 I’m glad you enjoyed my post. Thanks for sharing!

  4. Suz O'Brien (@OBriensAbroad)
    | Reply

    How interesting! I never thought certain barks could mean something!

    • Front Seat Ryder
      | Reply

      I’m so happy you enjoyed it. 🙂

  5. Nicole
    | Reply

    Great post. I wish I’d been able to read it when I still had my dog, Nina. Although, I was definitely able to recognize her playful bark. I love that you believe in teaching two-way communication with dogs – now if you could decode my cats meows… 😊

    • Front Seat Ryder
      | Reply

      Haha. Thank you, Nicole! I will work the meows. I lost my kitty a couple years ago. My boy, Ryder loved his brother kitty, Dixie. We will adopt another when we are ready I’m sure. I’m glad you enjoyed the post. 😊

  6. Samah (@godandwandrlust)
    | Reply

    This post is very informative! As someone who’s dying to get a husky and Doberman (they’re so adorable!) it will be much better to understand them in the future. But first I need to move at as my parents won’t allow dogs in the house haha

    • Front Seat Ryder
      | Reply

      I’m glad you liked the post! My first dog was a dobie. She was the sweetest! When you get a pup, don’t be afraid to share pics! 😉 I would love to meet your new addition.

  7. Marnie Schwartz
    | Reply

    that was a great post! And absolutely true! I have had dogs all my life and they each had their own levels of barking. Funnily enough, my beagle barely barked and that is their name. “barking beagles”… cheers!
    Marnie

    • Front Seat Ryder
      | Reply

      Haha. Ryder is not a huge barker either. And he is part hound. I’m glad you enjoyed my post!

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